Review

Fujifilm XT4 Review, Specs, Price, and Release Date

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Fujifilm XT4 Review, Specs, Price, and Release Date. The Fujifilm X-T4 is a high-end mirrorless camera with a 26 Megapixel APSC sensor, 4k up to 60p, 15fps bursts, built-in stabilisation and a fully-articulated touchscreen. Announced in February 2020, it comes roughly a year and a half after the X-T3 and rather than replace that model, the X-T3 will remain on sale at a lower price. I had a chance to get my hands on a pre-production X-T4 at a Fujifilm press event and in the video below I’ll show you around all the new features.

With long-awaited built-in stabilisation, it would be easy to assume the X-T4 is a merger of the X-T and X-H ranges, but Fujifilm’s keen to point out the X-T4 is very much the evolution of the X-T series and that the X-H series will continue, presumably with larger higher-end models in the future. Since the X-T4 already has such a broad and powerful feature-set, I can only assume the X-H series will aim for physical body upgrades, but I’m not a rumour channel, so I’ll concentrate on the facts here.

The X-T4 builds-upon one of my favourite all-round cameras, inheriting the style and quality of the X-T3, while addressing my key complaints. Fujifilm’s managed to squeeze built-in stabilisation, a more powerful battery and a fully-articulated screen into the X-T4 while only making the body a little thicker, and also thrown-in faster burst shooting at 15fps, better slow motion video at 1080 240p, and a nice new Film Simulation for the moody videographers out there. It seems almost churlish to find faults, and what little you could complain about is pretty minor. It’s a little annoying to lose a dedicated headphone jack, but you can adapt the USB port and a cable is provided. The viewfinder resolution hasn’t been improved, but 3.69 million dots is still a decent spec.

The sensor isn’t new, but then it’s not that old either. Probably the biggest complaints will be addressed to the side-hinged screen by those who prefer the older mechanism, but this is purely personal and as far as I’m concerned, I like the new approach much better. You may also wonder why the X-T4 doesn’t have a pixel-shift mode that uses IBIS to boost the resolution or reduce colour artefacts especially as the GFX100 was confirmed to receive this in a future firmware update, but this is most likely due to the 6 × 6 filter array of the X-Trans sensor being more complex to de-mosaic than the 2 × 2 bayer pattern in the GFX and other cameras. As for the stabilisation and AF improvements, I’ll reserve judgment for my upcoming review of a final production sample, but it’s certainly looking very promising. Ultimately I think Fujifilm has done a great job at enhancing a popular model without compromising its charm, and the pricing is sensible. Again I’m reserving my final verdict until I’ve fully tested a production body, but the X-T4 looks set to become one of, if not the, best cropped sensor camera to date.

Summary

The X-T4 builds-upon one of my favourite all-round cameras, inheriting the style and quality of the X-T3, while addressing my key complaints. Fujifilm’s managed to squeeze built-in stabilisation, a more powerful battery and a fully-articulated screen into the X-T4 while only making the body a little thicker, and also thrown-in faster burst shooting at 15fps, better slow motion video at 1080 240p, and a nice new Film Simulation for the moody videographers out there. It seems almost churlish to find faults, and what little you could complain about is pretty minor.

It’s a little annoying to lose a dedicated headphone jack, but you can adapt the USB port and a cable is provided. The viewfinder resolution hasn’t been improved, but 3.69 million dots is still a decent spec.

The sensor isn’t new, but then it’s not that old either. Probably the biggest complaints will be addressed to the side-hinged screen by those who prefer the older mechanism, but this is purely personal and as far as I’m concerned, I like the new approach much better.

You may also wonder why the X-T4 doesn’t have a pixel-shift mode that uses IBIS to boost the resolution or reduce colour artefacts especially as the GFX100 was confirmed to receive this in a future firmware update, but this is most likely due to the 6×6 filter array of the X-Trans sensor being more complex to demosaic than the 2×2 bayer pattern in the GFX and other cameras.

As for the stabilisation and AF improvements, I’ll reserve judgment for my upcoming review of a final production sample, but it’s certainly looking very promising. Ultimately I think Fujifilm has done a great job at enhancing a popular model without compromising its charm, and the pricing is sensible. Again I’m reserving my final verdict until I’ve fully tested a production body, but the X-T4 looks set to become one of, if not the, best cropped sensor camera to date.